Local Beer: Union Jack Brewery

unionjackAndrew and I recently got around to trying a couple of different selections from one of the local breweries. The Union Jack Brewing Company opened in May 2015.  Initially their beers were only available in-house but they just recently managed to get their beers into the Beer Store.  A number of local restaurants also offer their beer on tap.

Algoma Pale Ale

The first Union Jack Beer I tried was a tall can of their Algoma Pale Ale.  Given my love of IPA style beers I was excited to try this selection though a bit leery given how many overwhelmingly hoppy beers have been labeled as IPAs recently.  Thankfully this wasn’t a beat you over the head with hops situation – the Algoma Pale Ale was well balanced with notes of hopes, malt, and subtle pine.  I really enjoyed this selection and it would be something I would definitely pick up again.

1870 Amber Ale

Andrew and I both tried this selection on draught at a local restaurant.  Though described in the style of an American pale ale, this felt more like a traditional amber selection to me.  I’ve really been enjoying the complexity but smoothness of amber ales recently and this was a good example of something simple but tasty.  Malty undertones and little to no hop taste.

Rapid River Cream Ale

Only Andrew has tried this one so far (okay, I stole a sip of his beer but not enough to comment on it).  It was a number of weeks ago that he had this particular beer – but remembers liking it if nothing else.  I figure that just means we have to try it again to confirm that it was good.

Beer of the Month: Pepperwood Bistro and Brewery

The final two beer selections from our latest beer of the month delivery were from Pepperwood Bistro and Brewery, located in Burlington, Ontario.  By the looks of things Pepperwood is a fairly standard small scale brew-pub operation (albeit with classier food/eating area) and they routinely make five standard beers, two of which were in this shipment.

One interesting thing we noticed about the Pepperwood beers was that the bottles seemed to be much lighter than the standard beer bottle.  Maybe they were made with thinner glass?

The first Pepperwood brew I tried was their Cream Ale which poured a hazy blonde colour with minimal head.  It had a slightly smell of hops and citrus.  There was a slight malty taste and a hint of bitterness while still being easy drinking.  A good summer weather beer that was a step above generic.

The second Pepperwood selection was their Monkey Brown Ale.  For whatever reason the Monkey Brown Ale’s we’ve tried so far seem to have been over carbonated or something — they poured with far too much head and took a very long time to settle.  That fact alone may have impacted the taste — it was okay but I’m not sure it was representative of how the beer would typically be like.  It poured a dark brown and had a classic nutty taste.  A bit darker than I prefer my nut brown ales typically, but lots of flavour packed in.